Portobello Salad

Posted by in Cooking, Easter, Lunch/Dinner, Salads, Sides | 0 comments

 

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Hello & Happy Monday

 

 

 

I get asked all the time about simple ways to obtain the maximum amount of nutrients in a food. My two best recommendations are green smoothies, those with a handful of fruit and ton son greens. and the traditional salad.

 

 


 

Although I love to get my veggies on, a lot of times salads can be a complete miss. Depending on the greens, blend of ingredients and the dressing can really determine whether or not you have a winner.

 


 

 

I’m a true foodie, so I can’t just throw some greens and tofu together anymore and be satisfied. This salad is a prime example of how you can effortlessly take a drab salad to a fab salad with a few extra ingredients and a little extra effort.

 

 

 

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My favorite thing about this a salad is of course the portobello mushrooms. I’ve been using portobellos in my salads for years! I find that they are affordable, easy to work with, can be made in bulk, and take on whatever flavor profile you crave.

 


 

 

If you’re looking for an effortless summer salad that packs color, a variety of textures, and both sweet and savory flavors, you have to try my recipe for a Balsamic Glazed Portobello Salad

 

 

 

 

 

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Why this recipe rocks:

 

Easy
Affordable
Flavorful
multiple textures

Colorful

Nutrient dense 

Filling 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Why Eat Mushrooms?

 

 

Increase your vitamin D

 Mushrooms are the only fruit or vegetable source of this critical vitamin. Like humans, mushrooms produce vitamin D when in sunlight. Exposing them to high levels of ultraviolet B just before going to market converts more of the plant sterol ergosterol into the so-called sunshine vitamin. In the U.S., portobellos fortified with vitamin D are already being sold, with a three-ounce (85-gram) serving providing about 400 IU of vitamin D (Osteoporosis  

 

Safeguard Against Cancer

Mushrooms are rich in disease-fighting phytochemicals, and eating them regularly has been linked to a lower risk of breast cancer in studies of Chinese and Korean women. Mushrooms also prevent prostate cancer cells from multiplying in mice—and might do the same in men.  

 

Supply Hard-to-Get Nutrients

One medium Portobello mushroom supplies 21 percent of the recommended daily intake of selenium and one-third your need of copper; it also has as muchpotassium as a medium-size banana. Other varieties are just as rich in minerals, a recent analysis found. What’s more, mushrooms retain their nutrients when stir-fried, grilled or microwaved.

 

Help You Cut Calories  

When ground beef was swapped out for mushrooms in lasagna, sloppy joes and chili, adults consumed 400 fewer calories per day, according to a Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health study. Researchers estimate that if yousubstitute mushrooms for ground meat in one meal every week, you can lose five pounds in a year. Just don’t sabotage this fringe benefit by preparing mushrooms with loads of butter. Instead, toss them into a nonstick pan that’s been lightly sprayed with oil, then sauté on low heat until they soften.  

 

 

 

 

 

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Arugula & Portobello Salad
Serves 2
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Prep Time
15 min
Cook Time
25 min
Total Time
40 min
Prep Time
15 min
Cook Time
25 min
Total Time
40 min
Ingredients
  1. 4 cups arugula
  2. 4 tbsp pumpkin seeds
  3. 8 slices watermelon radish
  4. 1 avocado
  5. 4 asparagus tips (chopped)
  6. 1/2 cup heirloom tomatoes
  7. 1/3 cup Follow Your Heart Vegan Parmesan
Marinade
  1. 2 tbsp olive oil
  2. 1 tsp sea salt
  3. 1/2 cup balsamic vinegar
  4. 2 tbsp cherry juice (optional)
Instructions
  1. Marinad: In a pan over médium heat add the ingredients and cook for 5mins and continue to stir. Maker sure the sugar dissolves. Consistency should slightly thicken. Set aside to cool
  2. Remove stems and wash mushrooms. Keep whole or slice into thick pieces. The thicker they are the less they'll shrink. Place caps in a bag with all the marinade ingredients and let sit for 1hr. (let them soak overnight If you can) Preheat the oven to 350. Lay out a layer of tinfoil on a pan and spread the mushrooms out making sure they are not touching. Cooking for 25-30 minutes. Should slightly shrink and become crisp.
  3. Assemble salad with all the fixings and top with mushrooms! Dress the salad with a little bit of olive oil and additional balsamic vinegar.
Notes
  1. - If you slice the bella's they will shrink a lot more compared to using just the full cap!!
Eat. Drink. Shrink. http://eatdrinkshrink.com/
   

 

 

 

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I’m Gabrielle, the founder & creator of Eatdrinkshrink.com. I established this website in May of 2012 to share my experience and knowledge as I pursue a career in the field of nutrition. I currently hold a BS in Nutrition & Dietetics from NYU and MS in Nutrition & Health Sciences.

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